Corn Shocks

Hello everyone.  I was going to link my last post "Hidden Gems" to Good Fences.  However I had a chance to get out the other day and make some fresh images so I'm using them for Good Fences today. 

I would also like to clear up a misconception. 

In one of my recent blog posts' title "November Landscapes" I shared some images that included corn shocks.  Some of my blog commenters called them "haystacks", however they are not made of grass. I realize alot of my followers are not familiar with the Nebraska Amish so I thought I would share a bit of information today.  You can click on the Nebraska Amish link for more info. One thing to note if you read the link is the population of amish has spilled over into Penns Valley where I live since we are not far from "The Big Valley"
  
Today we will take a much closer look at a "corn shock".  As you can see in the following image, these are actually full grown corn stalks. Then the Amish cut them and stack them into these tepee looking stacks or "shocks" as they are called,  for the corn to dry and also to keep it off the ground so it doesn't pick up more moisture. At some time in the future they will take the corn shocks and either put them through a horse drawn corn picker to husk them or they will husk them by hand.

Some of the shocks can get rather weather beaten from the snow, rain and wind until this is done. I love to see them all over the hillsides.

Please click on images to make them larger. Sorry for such a long post today.






Linking with Theresa at Run Around Ranch for 


Yogi, Sylvia and Sandy for SKYWATCH FRIDAY.

Hope you all have a wonderful weekend.

Comments

Suza said…
beautiful winterpictures. So lovely the little hoods of gras!
best regards
susa
And there are scores of city dwellers like I who could not see the difference! Thanks for telling about it! These captures are beautiful!
Barb said…
Idyllic landscapes of farming country.
eileeninmd said…
Hello Felica, beautiful scenes and photos. Thank you for sharing the corn shock info. Have a happy day!
Latane Barton said…
wonderful explanation of what a corn shock is... I grew up with those in the fields. And, what nice pictures. Great post.
Christine said…
Hello Felicia, I'm always glad to learn more about the Amish & their farming methods.
Your shots of snowy farmland & fences are magical & the skies so lowering & broody! I think it's colder where you are as we didn't get nearly as much snow!
Have a great day!
Linda W. said…
Thanks for clearing that up....I thought those were cute little haystacks. :)
Breathtaking said…
Hello Felicia!:) Your snow scenes with fences and corn shock's are truely beautiful.
TexWisGirl said…
i just love your views.
Revrunner said…
Pretty against the snow.
Tanya Breese said…
oh these are so beautiful felicia!
Cloudia said…
These photos sing of your connection to the land!
Primitive Stars said…
Afternoon Felicia, beautiful scenery, looks winter wonderful.Blessings Francine.
Carol Mattingly said…
These images are gorgeous Felicia. What beautiful farm scenery. Carol
Nancy said…
Such gorgeous winter scenes....
Rose said…
Wonderful pics, Felicia. And thanks for the link to the Nebraska Amish.
Michelle said…
People here in KY call them corn shocks. I really love that last photo, the white house and moody sky and perfect.
Beautiful photos Felicia
Brenda
The Furry Gnome said…
I like your longer post with a little bit of explanation. Always nice to learn something new. I often think some of the posts i visit could be longer.
Indrani said…
Awesome scenes. For someone like me who doesn't get to see snow in such a large scale these are breath taking.
Jeanne said…
Wow... Those are really special photos. I feel like I can walk into them.
Stephanie said…
I have always wondered about those piles seen in other photos over the years. Thanks for the clarification on the corn shocks. On closer inspection, it certainly does not look like hay. Beautiful scenery in your shots.
Brian King said…
Gorgeous skies and photos!
I've always wanted to see the corn done that way - but we live in an area where machinery does all the work. Your photos are fabulous - they look like vintage paintings.
Mersad said…
Really lovely images, the fresh snowfall does them good. Love how the houses are peeking out of the landscape, as well was he fences surrounding them.

Mersad
Mersad Donko Photography
They used to stack sheaves of wheat or barley like that in the days before the combine harvester in England. I'm glad to see that you call them "shocks", as in England all the books call them "stooks", though "shocks" was definitely the word used around here.
Marco Luijken said…
Hello Felicia,
Very wonderful images. Great this winter view of this landscape.
Well done!!

Many greetings,
Marco
Kayni D said…
Wow...landscape there is beautiful. Great photos.
Nancy Chan said…
Beautiful snowy field.
Paul said…
Beautiful scenes, picture postcard perfect on the first photo to be sure!
Mascha said…
Great photos, interesting post. I like the winter colors.
carol l mckenna said…
Very creative wintry shots with neat fences!

Happy Weekend to you ~ ^_^
Klara said…
wonderful images. and interesting new information.
What Karen Sees said…
Beautiful winter scenes and interesting information as well!
I wasn't going to overwhelm you with comments on every post that I have missed (due to pretending to be busy or that I have a real life, or something) ... but I had to thank you for these pictures and for teaching me something new.