Thursday, June 25, 2015

No Aurora Borealis

After the solar flare hit earth Monday, there was a chance that the aurora could be seen as far south as Pennsylvania on Tues and Wed night. 

So after I got off work at 11:30 I found a dark spot on the way home to see if I could see it. 

Nope I did not find it but it would have been the perfect night. There was little streaks of clouds in the sky and it was clear.

So I set up my tripod and decided to experiment with night photography.  Now for those of you out there who have done this, please don't laugh, lol.  This was my very first try at it and now I think I am hooked on a this new aspect of photography for me.  I must do some research now to learn more about the settings to get the correct exposure.  

If I recall this is a 30 second exposure and I'm amazed how many more stars you can see than with the naked eye.  The red is from some city lights about 25 miles away that were reflected up into the night sky. Still the images is a bit dark yet. 


So does anyone have any tips they want to give of where I can find more info besides you tube or have you shot night time sky images and how have you done it. 

Linking with Yogi, Sandy & Sylvia at


Have a great weekend everyone. 

31 comments:

Beatrice Euphemie said...

What a beautiful photo, Felicia! A wonderful first effort! I don't have any tips, but I would be interested to learn. Hope your week is going well. xo Karen

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

I love the results of your experiment. I have no advice to offer.

The Furry Gnome said...

I did the very same thing last night - no Northern Lights, but I took some night sky shots anyway. Just like you, I used a 30 second exposure on a tripod, and I did get some neat stars and clouds.

Spare Parts and Pics said...

Excellent first attempt! My advice would be to keep the exposure somewhat short (don't be afraid to crank up the ISO... 1800 or higher, and use the largest aperture available on your lens). It's amazing how much the stars move at night, and even a 30 sec. exposure will result in star movement and the image won't be as clear as with a shorter exposure. Hope this helps, and good luck!!

Al said...

Very nice! The only suggestion I can make about night-time photography is practice.

TexWisGirl said...

well, you're already ahead of me on technique. :)

Stephanie said...

Gorgeous shot! You did well on your first try.

Barb said...

Still - a lovely night photo.

Chandra Eswaran said...

Beautiful night photo, Felicia.
You are so fortunate not to have the interference of city lights, when trying to photograph stars.

The only hint I might have is to use the Bulb Mode and go to a really dark area and focus right at the sky with a wide angle (may be) or a fish-eye, may be?

Have a Wonderful Day!
Peace :)

CelestinaMarie@SouthernDayDreams said...

Beautiful night shot Felicia. You are off to a great start. So talented!!
cm

Paul said...

Pretty amazing for a first try at night photography!

You should have seen my first few attempts... Ha ha!

Ileana said...

Beautiful!

Gemma Wiseman said...

Such enchanting night sky colours. I can't help with night shots, but saw the tip from Spare Parts and Pics blogger above.

Revrunner said...

Past my bedtime, I'm afraid. :-)

eileeninmd said...

Felicia, I think your did great on your first try. The stars look beautiful. It is a gorgeous night shot. Have a happy weekend!

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Actually, I think this image is quite beautiful. It shows the drama and colors of the night sky!!!

And your summer fence[s] post, below this one, is just as stunning.

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...

ahhh...pretty...but if you could have used your software to boost up the highlights, brighten those stars more...

Rebecca said...

I haven't attempted much night sky photography but have seen blogs with just beautiful breathtaking images. I wish I could remember them because one guy always told his settings.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

How funny you should have posted about this today Felicia. I was only talking today to a friend who is really good at time lapse photography to see if he could give me some tips as I've never tried it. I love your first shot, very dramatic.

don said...

I enlarged it and was amazed at the number of stars that became visible. Nice shot. Try some more with increased exposures.

Debbie said...

i have zippo....i am the worst at night time photography!! your image is really love and looks great to me which = we already know what you are doing!!!

Rose said...

I have tried to scan the comments already...just making sure that you know the smaller the number on the f-stop the larger the opening. (also, the larger the aperture opening, the depth of field becomes shallower.)

It has been a long time since I tried any...there are a few shots on my Pics and Pieces blog that are labeled night shots, or something like that.

Rose said...

And like someone said...just experiment...

NatureFootstep said...

sorry you did not see the Aurora. We were lucky to see it once in late march :)

Janice / Dancing with Sunflowers said...

Your night shot is gorgeous, and if you just muddled through without the benefit of any theory then you're doing extremely well.

I have not yet tried any star photography, although I really want to do this, and would love to get some star trail images. However, I did photograph the Aurora three times earlier this year when I was in the Arctic, and that included the stars. So here's what I can tell you:

Set your ISO to the highest you can - mine is 1600.
Set your F stop to the widest you can - so the lowest number - mine is about F4. Even if your camera goes wider than that it might be best to just stick with F4.

Then experiment with different exposure lengths. I got clear stars in my Aurora images, and really good shots of the Aurora using 10 - 13 second exposures on one night, and about 5-6 seconds on another. With these settings you probably don't need your exposure as long as 30 seconds, but try lots of different lengths of exposure and see what you come up with. The longer your exposure - much longer than 30 seconds - the more likely you'll be to achieve star trail.

Good luck!

Gert said...

Wow! Great photo! I think you did an amazing job.. I'm very inexperienced, so can't help you!

Blessings,
Gert

Juliana said...

wonderful skywatch... superb

xoxo, Juliana | PJ’ Happies :)

EG CameraGirl said...

I've never tried night photography...but I wanna! Someday. Soon, I hope. ;)

CountryMum said...

Great photo for your first attempt! I too have been experimenting, but am nowhere near mastering night photography. My advice is to try different settings to see what your camera/lens is capable of, and do some research. There are some fantastic websites out there that have advice and instructions on taking star or night photos.

Gunilla Bäck said...

Lovely shot! I've never really done any night photography.

NatureFootstep said...

I think you are doing great. In cases like this it is always a "trial and error". The weather changes at all times and so will your setting.